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Future Predictions

by Dr Robert M Goldman PhD, DO, FAASP In 1998, Kodak had 170,000 employees and sold 85% of all photo paper worldwide.  Within just a few years, their business model disappeared and they went bankrupt. What happened to Kodak will happen in a lot of industries in the next 10 years – and most people don’t see it coming. Did you think in 1998 that 3 years later you would never take pictures on paper film again? Yet digital cameras were invented in 1975. The first ones only had 10,000 pixels, but followed Moore’s law. So as with all exponential technologies, it was a disappointment for a long time, before it became way superior and got mainstream in only a few short years. It will now happen with Artificial Intelligence, health, autonomous and electric cars, education, 3D printing, agriculture and jobs. Welcome to the 4th Industrial Revolution. Welcome to the Exponential Age. Software will disrupt most traditional industries in the next 5-10 years. Uber is just a software tool, they don’t own any cars, and are now the biggest taxi company in the world. Airbnb is now the biggest hotel company in the world, although they don’t own any properties. Artificial Intelligence: Computers become exponentially better in understanding the world. This year, a computer beat the best Go player in the world, 10 years earlier than expected. In the US, young lawyers already don’t get jobs. Because of IBM Watson, you can get legal advice (so far for more or … Continue reading

Building Independent Public School Principals for the Future

Western Australia’s principals of Independent Public Schools will soon benefit from an innovative program to be facilitated by Integral Development, one of Western Australia’s most unique and experienced leadership development companies. Integral Development was selected from a national field of over 30 companies to enable the Western Australian Department of Education to build empowered schools that lead to high performance, high care cultures. Over 450 Independent Public School principals will be attending a Department of Education advanced leadership program called Leading for Impact run by Integral Development. Leading for Impact incorporates 4-day workshops that will commence in Term 3, enlisting 30 outstanding principals to work as support facilitators alongside Integral Development’s professional facilitators. Principals will learn key skills in becoming strategic leaders as well as being able to examine and adopt their own skills relevant to their changing environments. Managing Director of Integral Development, Dr Ron Cacioppe, said “We are proud to partner with the WA Department of Education to deliver a program that is leading the country in terms of leadership development for principals of Independent Public Schools so that they are equipped to build the capacity of their teachers and ultimately improve the outcomes of students.” This unique program will run over the next twelve to fourteen months and is funded through the Australian Government.

Professional development – don’t ask, don’t get!

You’d love to attend the program or workshop, but you are dreading the conversation with your manager, director or Board – whoever it is who approves your professional development. If you are a woman, our experience at Integral Development shows that you’d rather offer to pay for yourself or split the cost with your employer. Or that you will prioritise the training needs of your team or colleagues, or the urgent work assignment over your own development. In our history as a training organisation, none of the above have ever have been raised as issues by a man undertaking professional development. Not asking for your professional development to be paid for by your organisation is symptomatic of a larger issue at play. In their book ‘Women Don’t Ask’, Linda Babcock and Sara Laschever outline the evidence for the many other areas where women don’t negotiate for themselves – from starting salary, to prestigious positions and their professional needs and rewards. So to take a step towards asking the even bigger questions, allow us to give you a few tips to help make the professional development conversation a success: Be direct and don’t use qualifying words “I was wondering what you would think if I maybe attended this course in September, if that’s ok?” is definitely not an effective way to convince someone to support your professional development. Think carefully about what you will say before the conversation, and make sure you link it to any agreement about your development that … Continue reading

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Facilitation – Spending Money to Save Money

As Bob Dylan said “The times they are a-changing” and with that, a greater need to be more efficient at work and “to do more with less”. Most leaders will not need convincing of the imperative to engage effectively with staff, customers and other stakeholders, and to innovate to achieve more with less in the context of tough economic conditions. Facilitation, a word derived from the Latin word ‘facile’, is ‘the act of making something easier.’ At Integral Development we have been providing facilitation services for over eight years to over forty different organisations. Within an organisation most leaders already appoint someone from within to facilitate particular meetings but if you’re wondering why those decisions, policies and plans sit gathering dust on a shelf, or why they are not delivering the outcomes that were hoped for, then it may be that the facilitation process needs to be examined. Maybe essential stakeholders were not involved adequately in the process or that the leader assuming the role of facilitator was unable to contribute fully to content of the task, rather than its process? Perhaps the group found it difficult to trust that the leader’s facilitation was content neutral? Integral Development uses a number of proven processes and methodologies to deliver effective outcomes in strategic planning, community and staff engagement, scenario planning and visioning, process improvement and innovation. Our facilitators work closely with our clients to design, deliver and manage a complete process to achieve the client’s specified outcomes. Appointing an external facilitator … Continue reading

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Asking for Professional Development.

Professional Development – you want it, but you really don’t want to ask for it! You’d love to attend the Integral Women in Leadership Program or the Integral Leadership Program but you are dreading the conversation with your manager, director or Board – whoever it is who approves your professional development. Allow us to give you a few tips to help make the conversation a success: Be direct and don’t use qualifying words “I was wondering what you would think if I maybe attended this course in September, if that’s ok?” is definitely not an effective way to convince someone to support your professional development. Think carefully about what you will say before the conversation, and make sure you link it to any agreement about your development that you already have with your manager, as well as organisational performance outcomes. For example: “I’ve found the perfect program to address the development challenges we identified in my last performance review. It will assist me to develop stronger negotiation skills and a clearer sense of my career direction, as well as teach me some new skills to deal with conflict. As a result, I feel confident that I will be able to better manage my team and also deal more effectively with difficult customers.” That sounds much more convincing, doesn’t it? Predict the most likely questions and have a response prepared Hopefully you have done enough so far to convince your manager that this professional development opportunity might be worth considering. But they may … Continue reading

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